South Africa

Why Late Mandela Is In Hell – Jim Solouki and Martin Baker

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 This is absolutely unbelievable. A Christian blog run by “Christians” wrote this article with reason’s why Nelson Mandela is in hell fire…(Its shocking but just read and decide..They also used the photos in this article with the captions)

Greetings True Christians!

Today Nelson Mandela, former president of South Africa, ended his worldly life and entered the depths of Hell. Mandela was an unsaved heathen, and died without knowing the Lord.

Not only did Mandela influence American Democrat Barack Hussein Obama, but he also practiced a heathen African tribal religion.

Unfortunately, while Mandela did some great things for the nation of South Africa by ending apartheid, Heaven is like an exclusive club, unsaved unwelcome. Mandela died unsaved, and is therefore not welcome in Heaven.
Nelson Mandela was also influenced by Darwinism and Communism! Mandela was an avid reader of Marx in the 1950s, and everybody knows that God hates Communists!
Mandela allied himself with Communists and heathen Indian Gandhi, who is also in Hell. Instead of seeking a Christian approach to freedom from apartheid, Mandela instead turned entirely to heathens. In fact, Mandela and Gandhi even are rumored to have engaged in rampant homosexual acts with each other while planning protests!
Mandela was also friendly toward Muslims, God’s hated people!
Mandela was linked to the American Civil Rights movement, and many members of this movement were Muslims. Know what the Muslims did after they got African Americans equal rights? They crashed airplanes into buildings and started sectarian wars in the Middle East. Nelson Mandela was allied with these heathen scum, and is now being punished for his earthly mistakes.

Tonight I watched many news stations. On every channel, they showed Africans lining the streets of South Africa, doing happy dappy heathen dances, perhaps in hopes that the voodoo rain god might look with favor upon the soul of Mandela.

Unfortunately, these savages are of the same cloth as Mandela. Nelson Mandela may have been a great AFRICAN nature, but by world standards, he was rather lacking. But alas, this is the best that Africa can do. Africa is a heathen continent filled with heathens, and it is no wonder that God allowed the people of Africa to be enslaved.

I implore those Africans still living to reject the sinful ways of Nelson Mandela and embrace Christianity so that they might not follow Mandela into Hell. Let us pray for the Africans, out of love.
Dear Lord Jesus Christ, please lead the Africans away from heathen religions and to You. Please lead the Africans to Christianity so that they may stop being punished with AIDS, poverty, and dirty water, and so that they may avoid the fate of Nelson Mandela and avoid being cast into hell. This we pray in the name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. Amen.

A heartfelt Christian messages from your friends,

Jim Solouki and Martin Baker

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Mr Zuma

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According to the South African president Mr Zuma, South Africa’s first black president and anti-apartheid icon Nelson Mandela is dead.

Mr Mandela, 95, led South Africa’s transition from white-minority rule in the 1990s, after 27 years in prison.
He had been receiving intense home-based medical care for a lung infection after three months in hospital.

In a statement on South African national TV, Mr Zuma said Mr Mandela had “departed” and was at peace.

“Our nation has lost its greatest son What made Nelson Mandela great was precisely what made him human. We saw in him what we seek in ourselves,” Mr Zuma said.”Fellow South Africans, Nelson Mandela brought us together and it is together that we will bid him farewell.” Mr Zuma said.

D’banj stuck in SA…laments about missing Peter Okoye’s wedding

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D’banj is stuck in South Africa where he went for a show…

Pictures : Woman keeps an adult LION as a pet in her house

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Animal lover Annel Snyman and her pet cat Timba exemplify the incredible bond that can grow between man and beast.
But Timba is no ordinary house cat. He’s a hulking house lion that can polish of 9lbs of raw meat a day and could bite off her head any time he liked.
But Timba is really a big softie, and loves nothing more than to cuddle up to Annel on the sofa of their home in the Waterburg region of South Africa.

Timba, who is one year and six months old, also enjoys going for walks with Annel’s six-year-old dog, Diesel and ‘helping out’ with everyday chores around the house.
And as these remarkable pictures show, Annel has now formed an incredible bond with the 120kg lion, after adopting him as a cub in March last year.

The 31-year-old, who lives in the Waterberg region of South Africa, just outside Bela-Bela, said she loved her unconventional pet. She said: ‘Family and friends have all had to adjust to the occasional tackle by a large cat while visiting.

Best fiends: As these remarkable pictures show, Annel has now formed an incredible bond with the 120kg lion, after adopting him as a cub in March last year

Best fiends: As these remarkable pictures show, Annel has now formed an incredible bond with the 120kg lion, after adopting him as a cub in March last year..
Lion love: The 31-year-old, who lives in the Waterberg region of South Africa, just outside Bela-Bela, said she loved her unconventional pet
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South Africa: Where Murder Happens in South Africa

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While many believe Johannesburg is the most dangerous metropolitan city to live in, in South Africa, the reality is quite different. Lizette Lancaster, analyst at the ISS, explains where murder happens, why location matters, and what this means for who can help to tackle crime.

While many people think that Johannesburg is the most dangerous metropolitan city to live in, in South Africa, the reality is quite different. Consider that between April 2011 and March 2012, police recorded more murders in Cape Town than in Johannesburg and Pretoria combined. This means that taking population into account, Cape Town residents are almost twice (1.8 times) more likely to be murdered than Johannesburg residents.

Yet this information is potentially misleading because the likelihood of being a victim of crime depends in large part on race, gender, age, economic profile and whereabouts in a city a person lives. For example, almost two-thirds of the Cape Town murders took place in just ten of the sixty police station precincts in the city, according to an analysis of crime hotspots we carried out at the Institute for Security Studies (ISS).

For years, Mitchells Plain experienced the highest violence and property crime rates in the country. With the recent surge in gang violence, Mitchells Plain and surrounding areas clearly require in-depth multi-disciplinary intervention. The Cape Town residential areas of Nyanga, Khayelitsha, Gugulethu and Harare remain the most murderous in the peninsula, according to an analysis which takes population size into account. These areas have experienced abnormally high murder rates for more than a decade.

Low-income areas most affected

Similarly, countrywide analysis of police precinct statistics suggests that income levels matter. Residents in low-income areas, the analysis shows, are far more likely to be murdered than their middle and high-income counterparts. Half of South Africa’s murders occur in only 13% or 143 out of 1,127 of police precincts.

A vast majority of the average of 43 murders that take place daily do not make the news. They happen in areas where crime and violence are part of the daily despair of residents who already feel marginalised and forgotten by media and politicians. The majority of murders are not premeditated or committed as part of a crime, like a robbery, but occur when an argument leads to physical assault.

Research shows that most victims are killed by acquaintances, friends or family members during disputes overwhelmingly fuelled by alcohol and in some occasions, drug abuse. Victimisation surveys, police docket surveys and mortuary surveillance studies reveal that the most victims of murder in South Africa are young black men. And studies reveal that most murdered women are killed by their intimate partners. And that men are six times more likely to be killed than women.

People tend to focus on our national murder rate which is four and a half times higher than the global average of 6.9 per 100,000 people. Yet, some 13% of police precincts in South Africa have murder rates below this rate. These areas include affluent such as Brooklyn (Pretoria), Garsfontein (Pretoria), Camps Bay, Claremont, Rondebosch (Cape Town), Edenvale and Linden (Gauteng). Meanwhile, residents of suburbs like Sandton, Parkview (Johannesburg), Durban North, Table View and Woodstock (Cape Town) and others have a murder rate of fewer than 10 per 100,000.

Over 10% of our policing precincts – more than 115 stations – have a zero murder rate. Three in four murders occur in just a quarter of the country’s police station areas.

While murder is often used as the main indicator to support arguments that South Africa is a violent country, it makes up only 2.5% of all violent crime. While there were 15,609 murders last year, a total of 607,877 other violent crimes including attempted murder, rape, robbery and assault were also reported to the police. When violent crime hotspots are analysed, central business districts remain the most high-risk areas in terms of violence in general, and specifically for robberies. The clear front-runner is Johannesburg Central, followed by Durban Central, Pietermaritzburg, Cape Town Central and Pretoria Central. These areas also experience very high property crime rates.

Social impacts of crime

Violence affects all South Africans, and the trauma of violence has lasting physical, emotional and often financial consequences.

Murder rates are driven by poverty, social ills and society’s general inability to deal with daily conflict and stress in a non-violent manner. Murder should therefore be seen as a social problem which cannot be solved by policing alone.

Unfortunately, South Africa does not have a comprehensive strategy that guides government departments, civil society organisations and the public and encourages practical ways to reduce interpersonal violence. This means that the police are saddled with the problem, an impossible task for one organisation to achieve.

Violence prevention requires long-term interventions. These may not be politically exciting to sell to a crime-weary public but are more likely to yield real results in reducing violence. Interventions which focus on improving parenting skills, reducing the exposure of children to violence and building self-esteem are more likely to interrupt the cycle of violence than anything the police can do.

South Africa has a shortage of over 50,000 social workers yet almost 70,000 additional police officials have been hired over the past ten years. It is about time that the government adjusts its approach to violence so that we don’t waste another ten years pursuing policies that will not reduce violence in our country.

Fortunately, the need for a new approach is recognised in the National Development Plan which urges a re-think on building community safety in the medium to long-term. The implementation of this plan needs to begin in earnest if thousands of lives are be saved and the full potential of all of us living in South Africa is to be realised.

Lizette Lancaster is Manager of the Crime and Justice Information Hub, Governance Crime and Justice Division, ISS. See also this Africa Check guide to understanding crime statistics and updates on the latest statistics.